SAT Math Test Prep – Guide to SAT Prep

What’s Tested On the SAT Math Section?

It’s almost time for another round of SATs. Many students are nervous about the SAT math section. Even if you think your math teacher was competent at teaching you, and you aced your math class, you may be worried that there are items that haven’t been covered and that could affect your grading.

Taking a math SAT can help to support your high school grades. It can also display your willingness to be skilled enough, and to have an interest in taking a math-based program in college or university. There are many fields that require excellent math skills, including economics, engineering, science, and technology. If you’re interested in any of these fields, good SAT scores will set you apart from other students for admission.

Here’s a rundown of what exactly is on the SAT math section so you can be confident while you prepare for testing.

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You’ll have 60 minutes for your test, and have to answer 50 multiple choice questions. You can be expected to be tested in four main types of math skills. They are 1. Numbers and operations; 2. Algebra and functions; 3. Geometry and related measurements; and 4. Data analysis, statistics, and probability.

If you’re a bit worried about what that all means, we can be a bit more specific. For each of these 4 sections, they can be broken down into parts. Numbers and operations will involve about 10-14% of the test, while algebra and functions involves 38-42%, geometry and related measurements involve 38-42%, and geometry and related measurements for 8-12%.

For numbers and operations, you’ll need to have a good understanding of the complex numbers, counting, elementary number theory, operations, ratio and proportions, matrices, and sequences.

The study of algebra and functions will require you to understand  equations, expressions, inequalities, modeling and representation, and the properties of functions such as exponential, linear, polynomial, and rational.

For the geometry and measurement component you’ll need to know what the plane Euclidean is, and be able to coordinate the following: Lines, parabolas, circles, symmetry, and transformations. You also need to understand three-dimensional objects such as solids, surface area, and volume, including cylinders, cones, pyramids, spheres, and prisms. The most important part of trigonometry is to know right triangles and identities.

The last part of the SAT involves the data analysis, statistics, probability, and mean, median, mode, range, interquartile range, graphs and plots, least squares regression (linear), and probability.

For the math SAT you’re allowed to use your calculator. However, don’t rely on it to solve all the questions. If there are questions you can solve in your head, do so, as this will be a lot quicker and can gain you extra time on more difficult questions. You may also be able to solve the first half in your head, then use your calculator for more difficult parts of the question.

Go through every math topic you need to know and do practice example questions. By making an effort you’ll be able to achieve the best SAT score possible.

SAT Math Practice Tests Tips

What Is the SAT No Calculator Section? 5 Tips to Do Well

There are two math components to the SAT. One allows you to use a calculator, while one doesn’t. This doesn’t mean that the questions are going to be more difficult if you can’t use a calculator, but you should still practice and learn more about the no calculator section. Here are 5 tips to help you do well on the math part of the test.

1. Understand key concepts of math. There won’t be just equations to solve on this portion of the test, you may have to actually use basic math concepts and have a good understanding of them. For the actual questions, they can be more abstract and theoretical than having real numbers.

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2. Learn to read problems. There may be questions that test your reading comprehension on the test. You should slow down a bit and figure out what the question is asking you. Sometimes they may have extraneous information that may have nothing to do with the problem. You need to figure out which details are important, and which are useless, and solve it from there.

3. Practice basic arithmetic skills. You should have a solid understanding of all basic calculations. If you’re too used to using a calculator then it’s even more important that you practice on paper. You also need to increase your speed when writing out your calculations by hand. It also helps to keep an eye out for mistakes so you can go back and find them quickly

4. Print all steps of the equation. Even if you can solve the question in your mind and put down the final solution, you should still write out all the steps that it took you to get there. Often you’re marked not just on the answer but on how you got there too. This will also help you to catch any mistakes on the way.

5. Work on practice questions. The more you practice, the better you’ll get. You’ll not only be able to figure out your mistakes, but you’ll be able to go back through a problem to see where you went wrong. You’ll also pick up faster problem solving skills. If you need test questions, the best place to find them is on the College Board website. You can find tests that come with all the solutions, so after you’ve tested yourself you can see how you did. Right now there are about five free but official SAT practice tests. You can print or download them for free. There are also some other sites that offer test questions, and have videos to show you how to work through the steps. There are also plenty of other resources to help you get through your SAT.

Don’t worry too much at first if you make too many mistakes as that’s the whole point of practicing and paying attention to tips. With time and practice you’ll be able to considerably improve your potential SAT scores.